Simplest Color Balance
Nicolas Limare, Jose-Luis Lisani, Jean-Michel Morel, Ana Belén Petro, Catalina Sbert
→ BibTeX
@article{ipol.2011.llmps-scb,
    title   = {{Simplest Color Balance}},
    author  = {Limare, Nicolas and Lisani, Jose-Luis and Morel, Jean-Michel and Petro, Ana Belén and Sbert, Catalina},
    journal = {{Image Processing On Line}},
    volume  = {1},
    pages   = {297--315},
    year    = {2011},
    doi     = {10.5201/ipol.2011.llmps-scb},
}
% if your bibliography style doesn't support doi fields:
    note    = {\url{https://doi.org/10.5201/ipol.2011.llmps-scb}}
published
2011-10-24
reference
Nicolas Limare, Jose-Luis Lisani, Jean-Michel Morel, Ana Belén Petro, and Catalina Sbert, Simplest Color Balance, Image Processing On Line, 1 (2011), pp. 297–315. https://doi.org/10.5201/ipol.2011.llmps-scb

Communicated by Yann Gousseau
Demo edited by Jose-Luis Lisani

Abstract

In this paper we present the simplest possible color balance algorithm. The assumption underlying this algorithm is that the highest values of R, G, B observed in the image must correspond to white, and the lowest values to obscurity. The algorithm simply stretches, as much as it can, the values of the three channels Red, Green, Blue (R, G, B), so that they occupy the maximal possible range [0, 255] by applying an affine transform ax+b to each channel. Since many images contain a few aberrant pixels that already occupy the 0 and 255 values, the proposed method saturates a small percentage of the pixels with the highest values to 255 and a small percentage of the pixels with the lowest values to 0, before applying the affine transform.

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